Windermere String Quartet

“Period performances that blend life, spirit and soul with a perfectly-judged sensitivity for contemporary style and practice.”
~   Terry Robbins, The WholeNote.

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Photo: Melissa Sung

Anthony is a founding member of the Windermere String Quartet, formed in the spring of 2005 to perform the music of Mozart, Haydn, Beethoven, Schubert and their contemporaries on period instruments, as well as new works inspired by the Classical period.

The Quartet presents its own series in Toronto, and has performed at Toronto’s Academy Concert Series, the Toronto Music Garden, Nuit Blanche, Toronto Early Music Centre’s Musically Speaking, Stratford Chamber Music, and the New Hamburg Live! Festival of the Arts. They have been Quartet in Residence at Music at Port Milford and CAMMAC’s Lake MacDonald Music Centre.

Their debut CD from Pipistrelle Music, The Golden Age of String Quartets, features quartets by Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven.

The Golden Age of String QuartetsReviews of The Golden Age of String Quartets

“From the first track (the Mozart K465 quartet), something is definitely different. There’s more mystery in the quiet introduction, due to the personality of each player. There’s more drama in the Allegro…”
barczablog

“These are sparkling, straightforward interpretations that nicely show off the more delicate, rhythmically lively sound one can get from period instruments.”
John Terauds, Musical Toronto

“The quartet’s choice of repertoire is impeccable, demonstrating taste and technique. A delight to hear.”
Scene Magazine

“The Windermere’s approach has an attractive, earthy honesty.”
OpusOneReview

“The recording, engineered by guitarist Norbert Kraft and produced by Bonnie Silver, one of the best teams in the business right now, is clear and detailed, and certainly reinforces the immediacy behind the sound of these period instruments.”
Classical Music Sentinel

“The Windermere String Quartet acquit themselves well on period instruments. I look forward to future programs and releases.”
Early Music America